Due to constant misunderstanding with my name I feel the need to change my intro. I am hateful, hateful of religion. I hate what religion does to people and that people use it as an excuse to not think. I have spent many years of my life as an Atheist and have learned to handle my emotions, but no other word quite describes how I feel towards religion short of hate. I am outspoken, open minded, and will share my opinion. If you're looking for someone who will always agree with you, that won't be me.
The Out Campaign: Scarlet Letter of Atheism
(Ricky Gervais is my icon photo, I seem to be asked a lot.) Follow HatefulAtheist on Twitter

24th September 2014

Question with 34 notes

Anonymous said: Look,I'm an atheist and I have and never will believe in a higher power. But you see that's my belief, and I couldn't give a single flying fuck about anyone else's religion. Your religion does not define who you are so just please stop. Stop judging religions and what people believe in it's their personal beliefs and you have no right to shit on them. Seriously grow up

You see though this is my page, which means I’m allowed to post or discuss whatever I’d like. I also don’t give a “flying fuck” about your opinion of what I chose to discuss or talk about. Religion doesn’t define who you are for some but it does tell us a lot about your world view. It tells us what your view is on the most ultimate questions in life, our origins, what happens after death, and to many people the right and wrong ways to live. People use this to influence society, to pass laws, and to try to influence other people in how they live. This is something that they take extremely serious, some people do chose to define themselves by their religion. Some people are so devoted to their religion that they will even kill and harm others for it. Yet as a secular individual my only recourse is to watch on in shock and horror and perhaps plead for a bit of sanity. I’m absolutely within my right to shit all over that however I please. If you don’t realize just how much the topic of religion influences us in so many aspects of our daily life and our history then trust me sweetheart, you have a lot to learn.

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24th September 2014

Photo with 42 notes

I was always so mad as a kid that I wasn’t confirmed and couldn’t go up and get a drink and a snack. I’d have to sit and watch, then stand, kneel, sit, stand, sing, kneels, stand, repeat.

I was always so mad as a kid that I wasn’t confirmed and couldn’t go up and get a drink and a snack. I’d have to sit and watch, then stand, kneel, sit, stand, sing, kneels, stand, repeat.

Tagged: CatholicismCatholicChurchHumorFunnyReligionBibleCommunionAtheistAtheism

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30th August 2014

Question with 18 notes

until-i-get-to-siberia said: I don't use religion as an excuse to not think...I think all the time. My mind is always racing. Just out of curiosity, what makes you say that people use religion as an excuse to not think? To be completely honest, your opinion doesn't make any sense at all to me. It just doesn't. At all..

Religious people don’t think as much as non-believers. Believers simply don’t have the same spark, the same insight, the same passion for knowledge that non-believers have. It is part of the reason I always find it hard to become good friends with believers because I can see the restrictions placed on your mind. You have some of the biggest answers of the universe all spelled out for you and if anything ever becomes too difficult to understand you can simply write it off as “god’s will” or “god’s plan” or some other equally vacuous shit. You don’t think as much because you simply don’t have to. You always have a way out, even if it is a completely hollow answer. Don’t worry if my opinion doesn’t make sense to you, I have a feeling that you come across a lot of things in life that don’t make sense to you. Perhaps you can just say my opinion is “god’s will” and it will give you comfort to quiet your small mind.

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19th August 2014

Question with 3 notes

Anonymous said: What do you think about Satanists? From what I see their rules look more logical among other religions. I don't know in depth obviously.

I am a pretty big fan of Satanism in some ways. I really enjoy reading the works of Anton LaVey and some of his general writings can be quite enjoyable (Satan Speaks, and The Devil’s Notebook). I’ve had a few discussions about Satanism face to face not too long ago and actually just recently had someone borrow my copy of The Satanic Bible. They originally had stated they thought all Satanists were just “trolls” or crying out for attention but I explained it is a real religion that is at least as valid as any other. I’d like to think he hopefully has learned a bit more about true Satanism but it’s hard to know. For me the only real issue I have with the teaching are that it is very self centered. It seems like a lot of things focus on the self only with little to no regard for others in the world. In some situations I am okay with a selfish attitude because sometimes it’s necessary but it seems so pervasive in Satanism that it just turned me a way a bit. I probably will be re-reading LaVey’s works many more times throughout my life because I simply enjoy them but I can’t really imagine fully taking on Satanism as my chosen belief system anymore.

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19th August 2014

Question with 6 notes

Anonymous said: lol!!

Did you catch a glimpse of yourself naked in the mirror?

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14th August 2014

Question with 8 notes

Anonymous said: Do you think it is wrong of me to do this? Whenever I meet new people either at university, work or wherever if they are very religious I don't form a friendship with them. I am polite but I don't try to make friends with them on anything other than a basic acquaintance level. It is not that I hate anyone I just feel like they already have a way of thinking that is clearly not like mine so in a sense I can be a snob about getting close to people like that.

I don’t see anything wrong with it as long as you’re still at least a bit flexible. You should still be open to meeting new people with varying world views and it may expand your mind but we all go through a screening process when we meet new people. Religiosity is just another criteria that we balance along with whatever (usually shallow criteria, but we all do it) other bits of information we use to try to decide who we would like to become better acquainted with or who we’d like to keep a good distance from. If somehow I find out in the first few minutes of meeting a person that they are strongly religious I figure it means we will likely have a clash of personalities. I’ll still be polite but I certainly won’t put extra effort in to becoming more friendly with that person. If it simply happens over time through general polite interaction that we become better friends so be it, that’s mainly what I mean in regards to not shutting anyone out and being flexible. Sometimes religious believers can be great friends with non-believers but you shouldn’t feel at all guilty for using religiosity as a deciding factor about who you want to put your time and effort in to. I don’t consider it snobbery, I consider it being honest with the criteria that you look for in people that you’d like to be around.

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14th August 2014

Question with 18 notes

Anonymous said: I've often read that the idea of homosexuality as a sin is invalid when taken in relation to other supposed vices that christians indulge in all the same (like shrimp eating and wearing clothing with mixed materials) but the retort that christians give me is often that "those other sins were in the old testament, and the new testament says that the OT is invalid. However homosexuality is still condemned as a sin in the NT'. Is there any way to counter this?

The bible is so contradictory and so vague that it can be used to argue for or against almost any view that the book even touches on. It takes a lot of studying and understanding to try to contextualize the bible since it is so far removed from our modern world. Unfortunately this is a nuance that Christians seem to ignore generally. You’ll almost never find a Christian arguing in favor of a biblical view that they themselves don’t hold. Chances are more than good that if you have a Christian using the bible to argue against homosexuality they are really just a homophobic bigot looking for justification for their fear and prejudice.

The fact that the bible leaves so many openings and so many loop holes there are quite a few ways you could response but of course Christians will attempt to find a way to counter back. For example:

- If the OT is invalid (among with many other huge theological ramification) then it wouldn’t matter that Jesus fulfilled any prophecies and he wouldn’t be the messiah.

- Matthew 5:17-18 “Do not think that I have come to abolish the Law or the Prophets; I have not come to abolish them but to fulfill them.¬†For truly I tell you, until heaven and earth disappear, not the smallest letter, not the least stroke of a pen, will by any means disappear from the Law until everything is accomplished.”

- The NT itself is nearly silent on homosexuality entirely except for a verse in Romans which is a Pauline epistle and not a commandment from God. Even then it is not expressly stated that it is “sin” but that they “abandoned natural function”.

- 1 John 3:4, sin is defined as a breaking of God’s law. If homosexuality is to be considered a sin it must be condemned by “God” which only happens in the OT. Without the OT stating that it’s against the laws, it shouldn’t be considered a sin.

There are a few others that could probably be brought up or mentioned but these are the ones coming to mind. I often like to mention to Christians that even if they think the bible condemns homosexuality and they are going to use that as their basis, how does the bible say that this “violation” should be handled? Well of course it says they should be killed, so if they really are a good Christian using their bible to justify their view why don’t they have the courage of their convictions? Why aren’t they out slaughtering people? It’s likely because deep down they know that they can’t follow the bible and they know that times have changed, they just won’t admit it. In general I find that I’ve grown to have very little patience for homophobic Christians, they’re not good people and I truly consider them enemies to humanity. They’ve spent nearly a lifetime building up their bigoted small minded views to the point that it would take nearly just as long to undo all the damage they’ve done. I wish you the best of luck if you do decide to take part in the discussions but I can tell you from experience you’ll probably end up more frustrated than satisfied.

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13th August 2014

Question with 14 notes

Anonymous said: Do you have a particular way you reply in a conversation when the topic of Islam comes up? I always get met with the automatic "Oh you're phobic/prejudice against us/them" and all of that non sense that I really just want to say "yes, because your religion is a violent sexist piece of shit just like other religions so I have no obligation to respect you or your fairytales" But obviously I want to state my reasoning and not just insult even if it is the truth.

When people immediately want to attack you and claim that your opposition to a barbaric and archaic religion is based on some personal shortcoming chances are you’re not going to have a worthwhile discussion. The funny part is that the people that so quickly sling these claims against others are often doing so for a reason that at root are entirely racist. They romanticize this group of “other” people as being special and pure because it is “other” and that they must speak up to try to protect it. They think that this group so far removed from themselves must be free of the corrupting influences they see in their everyday life. They do this out of a shallow form of ignorance. Chances are if that is the type of discussion you’re getting it’ll be better to just walk away until people actually want to discuss the topic and not the presenter. It still amazes me that so much of the world sees the United States as anti Islam but the moment people attempt to open up discussion about Islam there is almost always someone willing to try to shout them in to silence.

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12th August 2014

Question with 16 notes

Anonymous said: Have you ever seen "Why I Hate Religion, But Love Jesus?"

Yep, a big steaming pile of shit in my opinion partly orchestrated by the known asshole and liar Mark Driscoll.

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12th August 2014

Question with 13 notes

Anonymous said: So I recently became an atheist. Yet my whole family is Pentecostal fundamentalist. I still live at home and am forced to go to church and not allowed to tell anyone I'm an atheist for fear of "leading them astray". Regardless my mother and I have constant battles, her being an apologist. One thing I have noticed though is that Christianity has become like a form of life support for her. For such individuals is it better to allow them there views? Even if you think there views are hurtful?!

I wouldn’t say better, but in some cases it is the only option. There are certain people that are just entirely unreachable. No matter what type of facts or information you present to them they’ll simply reject them. There are people that cling so strongly to their religious ideas that there is absolutely nothing in the world that will get them to give it up. The more you try to discuss or dissuade them the more the they dig in deeply to their convictions. I feel terribly sad for those people, they certainly aren’t better of, they’ve just given up on any other way. They are some of the saddest victims of religion in my view.

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